Tag Archives: Reviews

Planetside 2

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War is hell. Unless it’s Planetside 2, in which case it’s totally rad. The battlefield is teaming with tanks rolling about, aircraft zipping through the air, foot soldiers hiding behind rocks, the occasional person shot in the back of the head by a friendly, or run over by an allied vehicle. See? Fun. Few games offer battles as large-scale as Planetside 2, and even fewer of those games are free to play. Sure, sometimes you’ll be reenacting the Alamo. But even those moments are thrilling.

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Dead Space 3

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Over the course of the Dead Space series, protagonist Isaac Clarke has gone from a lowly engineer to supreme slayer of necromorphs. The second game gave voice to the previously silent character, and now Dead Space 3 has given him, apparently, the power to obliterate everything in his path. EA and Visceral were forthright in admitting that the third game would shy away from the survival horror aspects that made its predecessors so popular. And so they have. Regardless of whether the directional shift was a good idea—that’s completely subjective—Dead Space 3 is still rather enjoyable.

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Dragonborn: Bloodmoon through the eyes of Skyrim

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Back when Skyrim first released, rumors abound that one of the expansions would take place in good old Morrowind. Naturally, I was excited. My rose-tinted glasses show that game in a fine light. Fast forward a bit, and here comes Dragonborn, which—lo and behold—takes place on Solstheim, the island featured in Morrowind’s expansion Bloodmoon. But despite foreign shores, Dragonborn is still very much Skryim, for better or worse.

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DmC: Devil May Cry, a redundant title for a not-so-redundant reboot.

DmC did not have a title screen, so I made my own.

DmC did not have a title screen, so I made one.

Before DMC: Devil May Cry, my experience with the series involved only the fourth game. I don’t recall much about it, other than finding the keyboard controls to be nothing short of torturous (this was before I made the brilliant decision to pick up a 360 controller). So let’s just say I went into the reboot unimpeded by the past. And you know what? DMC was pretty rad, in a goofy sort of way. Sure, the new Dante was kind of doofus, and some of the writing was laughable (in a good way). But the combat was (mostly) pretty good, platforming was fun, and the level design was simply great.

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On the Path of Exile

path of exile

Path of Exile went into open beta recently, and as a connoisseur of fine loot, I dove right in. 30 some-odd levels later, and I thought I’d offer some slightly-beyond-first impressions. Anyone familiar with action RPGs will feel right at home. Path of Exile’s got acts, and waypoints, and randomly generated dungeons out the wazoo. In many ways, the game harkens back to the action RPGs of yore. The graphical presentation is strikingly similar to that of Diablo 2. Path of Exile is dark, grim, bloody, and mature.

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Spec Ops: The Line

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Let’s get this out of the way: Spec Ops: The Line has one of the best, most intriguing stories in years. At the same time, the game surrounding that story is just sort of average. Sprint from cover to cover. Shoot the enemy. Hide until health is regenerated. Then shoot some more. That’s what you’re doing for the entire, 4-6 hour game. However, the best, most intriguing stories in years is not light praise. It’s a downpour of praise. Average gameplay aside, Spec Ops: The Line is one hell of a game.

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They Bleed Pixels, and So Will You

They Bleed Pixels

In simplest terms, They Bleed Pixels is a 2D platforming brawler. And it is quite true to its name. When you’re not leaping around from super-dangerous platform to super-dangerous platform, you’ll be smackin’ around pixelated enemies, who die with a gush of pixelated blood that flies everywhere and covers everything. So, yeah, it’s got style. Lots of it. What it’s also got, in even greater amounts than style, is difficulty.

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